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Training for Max Strength, Size and Symmetry

 

There's no "right" way to train. That “one program fits all” doesn’t exist. So how do you find what will work for you?

 

  • Experiment with a variety of programs
  • Use something that you enjoy
  • Set a goal and create your plan to achieve it

 

Does It Matter How You Train? Strength vs. Size & Symmetry

 

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Some training routines have powerlifters in mind and building strength, and others more geared for size gains for bodybuilders. Most athletes lean towards one more than the other. However, the more experienced athletes keep a good balance between both.

 

When applied properly, both types of training routines will inherently benefit each other. Personally, I train 6 days a week and hit each muscle group at least once.

 

No matter your goal, if there is a muscle group you’d like to improve train it more than once a week.

 

That second training session will usually consist of the opposite of what I did previously that week. For example, if I worked my chest and focused on heavy weight with fewer reps, my second day will consist of a combination of speed work with lighter weight and less rest between my sets to focus on that blood volume.

 

On a typical training day I begin with heavier weight with my core lifts.

 

  • Bench Press
  • Squat
  • Deadlift
  • Military Press

 

As I progress through my workout I begin to lighten the weight and increase the reps, while decreasing rest between sets.

 

  • Combine higher reps with low rest periods for a greater pump and quicker growth.

 

The more muscle you pack on your frame, the more weight you will inherently be able to sustain. It's easier for a bodybuilder to transition into powerlifting than it is for a powerlifter to transition into bodybuilding. With that said, there are also many misconceptions out there.

 

Powerlifting Myths

 

One I most frequently hear is that if you want to get strong you lift heavy weight with few reps and if you want to get ripped you lift light weight with a lot of reps. it’s not that simple. Nutrition plays the most significant role in ones physique. Anyone can eat whatever they want, get sloppy, and push a lot of weight. For me being a Powerlifter, my main objective is to lift as much weight as I can, however, I care about my health and appearance as well. If you look at the other best Powerlifters in the world in my weight class, Dan Green, Matthew Schmidt, Sam Byrd, Chris Duffin, you'll notice that they look like bodybuilders as well.

 

  • Parting notes:
  • Take your diet serious.
  • Don't always follow one routine. Find the best of both worlds.
  • Try different things, find what you like and works for you, and have fun with it!

 

USPlabs Luigi Fagiani Scary Strong

 

Prepared by Luigi Fagiani

 

Disclaimer The information provided in this article, as well as this web-site blog is intended for informational and educational purposes only and should not be interpreted as medical advice for any condition. Always consult a qualified medical professional before beginning any nutritional program or exercise program. By reading this disclaimer, you hereby agree and understand that the information provided in this column is not medical advice and relying upon it shall be done at your sole risk.