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Summer Strong - Ultimate Burn

 

It all began here and here it will forever stay. Your first true fitness experience and your most memorable moment as a teen. I’m talking about your local High School track, and since school’s out for summer, it’s time to get back on that crushed rubber and get those sticks kickin’ to high heaven! Track and Field is the forefront and foundation to Strength and Conditioning so no matter your goal, your local track can add countless benefits to your programming and a little sun to your days as well!

   

The benefits of track conditioning far outweigh that of the typical treadmill workout. Not only is it significantly easier to measure and progress, but much smoother to program and apply to most athletic events whether it be running intensive, power or cosmetic. Sprinting specifically can help improve size, definition, and body fat composition as well as power, dynamics and recovery. All you will need are some quality track shoes and a local facility open to the public.

   

Firstly, being that track training typically involves high levels of running volume… it’s important to perform some regimented mobility programming. This should include a light, low impact warm up, foam rolling, some dynamic movements and light stretches. Good mobility programming can prevent major overuse injuries and allow for more a consistent form as you put yourself through your paces. Once warmed up, try the following program out to get you a solid high intensity workout to facilitate some quality gains…

   

USPlabs ModernPROTEIN

   

Warm-Up Programming (10-15 Minutes of quality movements) ½ Mile Run at 50% pace to limber up

 

Pacing Drills: Perform the following for 2x100 meters:

  • Shortened Quick Feet Stride
  • Exaggerated Long Stride
  • High Knee Stride
  • Butt Kicks

   

Summer Strong - Track Training

   

Rest - 5 Min

  • 200M Acceleration and Deceleration x 4

  **Accelerate to 100% from Meter 1 to Meter 150, then immediately decelerate to a jog, then take 2-3 Min Rest between each.

   

Rest - 5 min

  • 100m Sprints 1:1 Rest at 95% Pace Rate x10

  **Time it takes to sprint 100m is then rested before the next 100m is performed… Done to capacity at present fatigue level**

 

High work capacity is key, and heart rate maintenance not only helps improve an athlete’s endurance but also allows appropriate blood flow to muscle tissues. Don’t think about losing your gains because the better your body’s endurance, the more capacity your system has to maintain its muscle mass and integrity, as well as your health.

   

Summer Strong Track Training

   

Prepared by Rob Saeva CPT

 

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Disclaimer The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of USPlabs or any employee thereof. Examples used within this article are only examples. USPlabs is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the information supplied by the authors of this article. Content contributors are not employees of USPlabs. Authors may have been remunerated by USPlabs.

 

The information provided in this article, as well as this web-site blog is intended for informational and educational purposes only and should not be interpreted as medical advice for any condition. Always consult a qualified medical professional before beginning any nutritional program or exercise program. By reading this disclaimer, you hereby agree and understand that the information provided in this column is not medical advice and relying upon it shall be done at your sole risk.