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Pro Tips | Chest Mass

 

“My face is up here.”   I’ve seen you in yoga class, and while my Wounded Peacock pose could use a little attention, I’m more than a sculpted piece of meat piled high at a smorgasbord in old country Ludvika. However, A 50+ inch chest claims attention; sometimes it’s from “yoga pants” over there at the water fountain, but most of the time it’s from that bro looking at us in the mirror.  But, what’s wrong with mirin’ your own gains? Sure, you may end up a YouTube star, but if you have a chest that only fits into a wide-angle lens, then by all means, let the haters hate. I had a chat this week with 5 PROS that are about to share their secrets to building some serious chest mass.

 

ModernPRE+ Be PREpared

 

“The most important detail to developing a big chest besides the obvious variety of big weight and light tempo work is muscle activation... whether it's a bench press or a fly, if you don't activate the pec's natural biomechanics, you'll be doing a hell of a lot of anterior delt and Tricep. Focus on the tissue and MAKE it work.” – Rob Saeva, Professional Strength and Conditioning Coach and Amateur Powerlifter

 

“The most common problem of chest development, as it relates to mass, involves exercise choices with most not making proper use of Dips (wide angled bar) and a form of Bench Press where the bar is lowered to near the throat (Throat Press). Developed by the true Iron Game guru, Mr. Vince Gironda, each should be a staple in the training of physical culture purists.” – John Davies, Founder Renegade Training™

 

“Employing a stretch and fill tactic to the end of your chest workout is a great way to elicit new growth. By stretching and filling your chest with blood volume, you will not only be supplying the target muscle with nutrients for growth but also stretching the muscle fascia which in turn will lead to bigger muscles. A great finishing movement for chest utilizing this tactic would be the stretch push up to failure. Position yourself between two aerobic steps and proceed to do power push-ups pausing at the top for a contraction then slowly return to the stretch position with your body lowered between the steps. Try 3 sets to failure on your next chest day.”  – Mike Rea| Competition Bodybuilder

 

“Try kettlebell flies. The position of the kettlebell's resistance keeps more tension on the pecs than your typical dumbbell.”  – Victor Egonu | Natural Pro Bodybuilder

 

“Offseason I’ve been building my chest with a 75 rep set. This must be done with a training partner on a hammer strength machine or equivalent.  Push out 25 reps with a 1 second pause at the top (using a comfortable weight) and really flex the pec. That is followed by 25 more reps with added weight making it your heaviest 25 reps. The motion here is much faster, not as controlled. After that, drop the weight but do a 3 second drop from the top of your rep, almost like a negative.” – Anthony Thomas | National Level Bodybuilder

 

Try these pro tips this week, and if you have any questions or ideas for future articles send us a message or post a comment. #LiveModern

 

TEAM USPlabs Anthony Thomas

 

Disclaimer The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of USPlabs or any employee thereof. Examples used within this article are only examples. USPlabs is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the information supplied by the authors of this article. Content contributors are not employees of USPlabs. Authors may have been remunerated by USPlabs.

 

The information provided in this article, as well as this web-site blog is intended for informational and educational purposes only and should not be interpreted as medical advice for any condition. Always consult a qualified medical professional before beginning any nutritional program or exercise program. By reading this disclaimer, you hereby agree and understand that the information provided in this column is not medical advice and relying upon it shall be done at your sole risk.