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ModernMASS | Chest


“Taking back Chest Day”


Arnold Schwarzenegger popularized an interesting training method for a bigger chest. Instead of training chest alone he combined with back. The antagonizing muscle groups provided not only aesthetics of a legend, but also improved his strength. However, over time chest day has gotten butchered. Millions are flocking to their Gold’s and 24 Hour Fitness to complete their giant set of Bench, Text, Curl, Flex, Smash a Mcdouble and coke- Gotta have those post workout carbs. While the bench is still one of the top moves to MASS and strength; if your bro is performing back day IE rowing the bar off you as you bench, this is not what Arnold had in mind. But we love the bench… Why??? Because a feat of strength on your back is the ultimate mark of a man… Is it because it stretches your stringed racerback tank top giving you an hour of glorious man cleavage… No matter the reason, for many of us chest day is the best day. So let’s get Jack3d!




Incline Bench Press:


The pectoralis major (main chest muscle) has two heads: clavicular and sternal. The clavicular or “upper chest” is what most will try to isolate during an incline bench press.  Rep range should be varied here; however, lean towards the heavier side. This may elicit more growth since the clavicular head of pec major contains a higher ratio of fast twitch fibers to slow twitch fibers.  Use a shoulder-width grip and play around with the reverse grip as well to get even more “upper chest” tension.


Hammer Strength Press:


Machines get a bad rap for building muscle.  Any bro at the gym will tell you that free weights are far more superior.  While free weights have many advantages over machines, something like the Hammer Strength Bench Press can provide iso-lateral support without the fear of taking a dumbbell to the face.  Dustin Carwile of TEAM USPlabs recommends going as wide as possible and keeping constant tension on the chest.


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USPlabs ModernMass Chest




Bro’s love to make rules.  An article you’ve read from stated the top 5 exercises never to do again. So you’re going to preach it to all over the web.  Without a proper understanding of kinesiology or even doing further research, we accept every article as truth.  The dips are one of these controversial exercises.  For healthy adults, dips can be a great exercise for mass.  John Davies, Founder of Renegade Training, says: “Given the potential stress upon the rotator cuff, maintain a ‘tight’ position as you slowly lower the body. Ensure you do not ‘over stretch’ as you will put the shoulder in a high-risk situation. Push off hands, raising body before stopping a fraction above ‘full lock out’, pause for a ‘two count’ and repeat.”


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Chest Mass Workout


Incline Press

1x12 // 1x10 // 1x6 // 1x8 (Reverse Grip) // 1x10 (Reverse Grip) 1x12 (Reverse Grip)

Hammer Strength Press

Iso-lateral (20 reps per side) 4 sets

Dips (EMOM – Every Minute on the minute) 12-16 Reps every minute on the minute for 10 minutes


Extra Credit

Add 10 push ups to each set of dips


Stay tuned next week as we discuss building a MASSive Back!  #LiveModern


USPlabs ModernMass Chest main


Prepared by Nik Ohanian


Disclaimer The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of USPlabs or any employee thereof. Examples used within this article are only examples. USPlabs is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the information supplied by the authors of this article. Content contributors are not employees of USPlabs. Authors may have been remunerated by USPlabs.


The information provided in this article, as well as this web-site blog is intended for informational and educational purposes only and should not be interpreted as medical advice for any condition. Always consult a qualified medical professional before beginning any nutritional program or exercise program. By reading this disclaimer, you hereby agree and understand that the information provided in this column is not medical advice and relying upon it shall be done at your sole risk.