FREE 2-3 DAY PRIORITY SHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS OVER $75!

Back To Categories
×

Registration

Profile Informations

Login Datas

or login

First name is required!
Last name is required!
First name is not valid!
Last name is not valid!
This is not an email address!
Email address is required!
This email is already registered!
Password is required!
Enter a valid password!
Please enter 6 or more characters!
Please enter 16 or less characters!
Passwords are not same!
Terms and Conditions are required!
Email or Password is wrong!

Hybrid Athlete | Swole and Agile

 

The issue with the present “fit-world” mindset is that only specific body types and avenues result in certain goals. The common misconceptions that to be fast you can’t be strong, to be strong you give up cardio and to be agile you basically have to do MMA are about as clinically sound as getting a psych diagnosis from your dog. The key to developing not only a massive physique but a fast and agile frame comes from careful programming and appropriate conditioning. If you don’t believe me, watch a game of football… genetics, sure, but genetics without the appropriate stimuli is no better than exactly what you’re doing day to day staying single-minded and doing your fasted cardio because that’s what everyone else does. With the right precision and periodization, you can take a tank of an athlete and turn him into an Apache Helicopter.

 

ModernPRE+ Be PREpared

 

Swole, aka Jacked, aka Yoked, aka Stacked, aka Truck House, aka AMTRAC Train Set is basically another way to say a balance between strength and hypertrophy. Someone whom has achieved “swole” status is typically thick, not shredded, but not fat with substantial muscle and a strong frame. We can already see the framework to an individual athlete being both agile and strong just from the implied necessity for conditioning to achieve such a physique. In order to achieve the appropriate strength and mass, one must program the appropriate strength progressions to accompany their agility work. As I always like to preach, quality progression and application of assistance work not only helps develop strength and work on weakness but also develops the physique as well.

 

Agility, on the other hand, is a matter of appropriate spatial awareness, mobility and speed. Graceful movement isn’t always accompanied by soft footsteps and ballet jumps, but should be more associated with an individual’s ability to maneuver and manipulate one’s own body weight through space without injury. To accomplish this, consistent and repetitive movement drills help achieve this spatial awareness. Movements can be as simple as shuttle runs or sprints or as complicated as running routes or practicing plays.

 

The following is an example of how a typical Programming Day would look when trying to be swole and agile:

 

Day 2

 

Full Pause Bench Press

70% 5x3

 

-Then-

 

50% 1xME Slow Tempo

45% 1xME Slow Tempo

35% 1xME Slow Tempo

 

DB Tate Press 3x20

 

Light Walking OH Bottoms Up KB Press 3x10 per arm | Standing upright with a tight grip, the bell end of the kb is held upright by the grip and pressed upwards

Doubled Kinetic Press (2 Hanging KB, Lights Inside, Heavier Outside) 3x20

12 Minutes, Alternating every 30 Seconds

100ft: Shuttle Run, Karaoke Run, Backwards Run, Forward Jog, High Knee Skip

 

Simplicity and repetition is key to developing the most agile athlete. When lumped up with a progressive strength program and the right nutrition, one can get absolutely be massive as a freight train and graceful as a flower… a really thorny one… with muscle... Rob Saeva

 

Written by Rob Saeva of No Coast Strength and Conditioning

 

Follow Rob on Twitter

 

Disclaimer The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of USPlabs or any employee thereof. Examples used within this article are only examples. USPlabs is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the information supplied by the authors of this article. Content contributors are not employees of USPlabs. Authors may have been remunerated by USPlabs.

 

The information provided in this article, as well as this web-site blog is intended for informational and educational purposes only and should not be interpreted as medical advice for any condition. Always consult a qualified medical professional before beginning any nutritional program or exercise program. By reading this disclaimer, you hereby agree and understand that the information provided in this column is not medical advice and relying upon it shall be done at your sole risk.