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Eating For Strength

 

Succeeding in the strength game is MUCH more than calories and chalk. To rise to the top, it takes discipline in and out of the gym. What you choose to eat on a daily basis will lead your progress.

 

I didn’t start off powerlifting. I was a local bodybuilding champion, long before I considered strength as a primary goal. After starting my first diet plan within bodybuilding, I was eating 7 meals per day and drank only water . Everything I ate was measured out. It was a little overwhelming at first but I was determined to get through it. It may have been boring, but it worked to get me lean. A common misconception of many interested in powerlifting is that diet can be neglected. You may not need to reach single digits body-fat while claiming a 2000lb+ total, but there are many key points powerlifters can learn from a bodybuilder’s diet.

  940x300_AminoLIFT_OCTOBERBANNER

  My primary foods where:

  • Egg whites
  • Oats
  • Chicken
  • Brown rice
  • Unsalted Peanuts,
  • Yams

 

I went years without swaying from these few choices. After a few weeks, it became a habit and was significantly easier because I was so used to it. I lifted heavy throughout the contest prep and I was getting significantly stronger while losing weight, my body was responding like crazy.

 

Let good nutrition become habit.

 

Competing in both bodybuilding and powerlifting has taught me the foundations of both should stay the same. Now that I’m focused more on Powerlifting I’ve kept eating relatively clean and following a similar diet, eating around 6 meals a day of mostly chicken and rice. This has kept me lean but I also let myself have burgers or burritos if I’m craving it.

 

Take control of your nutrition so it doesn’t control you.

 

I’m currently between 225-230lbs and compete at 220lb. I still have the same outlook and want to be lean while being as strong as possible. For me the most important thing is keeping a clean diet but not stressing too much about “cheating” on it. My reasoning behind that is doing what it takes to reach your daily requirements for protein and caloric intake. While training for strength, I see a late night cheat meal being more beneficial than falling behind on your requirements from missing meals earlier in the day.

 

Fuel the Machine.

 

Do not eat for bulk, eat for performance. Unlike the chicken you have in the freezer, your diet can not just be “winged”. If you’re serious about your results, track your macros. It doesn’t take much time out of your day to plug a couple numbers into an app. Try my current plan of:

 

  • 1g of Protein per pound
  • 1.5g of Carbs per pound
  • .5g of Fat per pound

 

Your body is a machine and should always be fueled to perform at its best.

  The Living Jack3d  

Writer: Kyle Sheridan

 

Disclaimer The information provided in this article, as well as this web-site blog is intended for informational and educational purposes only and should not be interpreted as medical advice for any condition. Always consult a qualified medical professional before beginning any nutritional program or exercise program. By reading this disclaimer, you hereby agree and understand that the information provided in this column is not medical advice and relying upon it shall be done at your sole risk.